Waiting for the New Baby Hoffman

While we stayed at Picture Lake Campground, we did a few things including going evangelizing and eating dinner with the Hoffmans on the weekends.  Also, for the birth of the baby, Mimi and Papaw (Mr. Josh’s mom and stepdad) came down with their RV and stayed a few weeks.

On September 2, us Wongs went to Richmond, Virginia and went to a couple of NPS sites.  The first was Richmond National Battlefield Park, dedicated to a bunch of battle sites from the Civil War (around Richmond).  We went to one of the visitor centers and watched a few videos about some of the main battles that happened in the area.

The next site we went to was Maggie L. Walker National Historic Site, the home of an entrepreneurial black woman who lived during the Jim Crow era.  She is known as the first black woman to found a bank, and she set an example for others of courage, perseverance, and kindness.  She lived in her home with her big family (including adoptive children).  We were given a tour of the house, which even had an old-fashioned elevator.

On another day, we went to the Science Museum of Virginia (in Richmond).  The museum’s main theme was speed, and there were time lapse videos, a multitasking test, air hockey with a robot, and more.  The museum was built out of an old train station, so there were trains in the back, which we got to look at.

Anna Joy Hoffman was born on September 14, 2021, around 6:22 PM.  I included pictures of food we ate recently in the video below as well.

On September 21, we went to Pamplin Historical Park, which is really near by to where we were staying.  It was a homeschool group, and a guide at the museum took us around and talked to us about the Civil War.  Inside were displays, an audio tour, and artifacts, while outside, there was a battleground model, historic buildings, and more.  There were multiple buildings to look at and go into, and we went everywhere.

Last time we’d been here, Petersburg National Battlefield hadn’t been completely open (due to covid).  On September 24, we revisited the area and went to the museum in the visitor center.  We also walked around the battlefield and looked at where the crater (a failed attempt at winning during the fighting) used to be.

If you didn’t already know, during the Civil War, this is where a nine and a half month siege took place.  Grant was on the offence and tried to gain control of the railroads that went in and out of Petersburg, since the city was such a large supplier of goods to the South.  Lee fought to protect the city, and when Grant’s attempt to capture Petersburg failed, it led to a long and difficult siege.  Ultimately, the Union won, and Lee surrendered soon after.