First Trip With the Hoffmans

On May 20, we moved to an RV park on a private property in Baton Rouge, Louisiana.  This was our first trip with the Hoffmans, and we caravanned the entire way.

While in Baton Rouge, we got to visit some friends, Mr. Jack and Mr. Ron, who are fellow believers in the Lord.  We also got to meet some people from their church.

Two days later, on May 22, we carravaned to Hodges Vineyards and Winery in Camp Hill, Alabama.  (We stayed here on April 26 as well).

The next day, we carravaned to Poinsett State Park in Wedgefield, South Carolina.  On the way, we stopped at Congaree National Park, where we took a 2.6 mile boardwalk hike.  Congaree was protected by the NPS because of its historical floodplain, once lived in or used (at separate times usually) by Native Americans, escaped slaves, and loggers.  Now, it is a great place to explore the outdoors, hike, and canoe and kayak.

While at Poinsett, we walked to the small waterfall, lake, and playground.  My brothers and Mr. Josh went fishing, and Mason caught a catfish.

On May 25, we moved to Threads Run Thru It, a quilting shop in Rustburg, Virginia (also a Harvest Host).  On the way, us Wongs stopped at Guilford Courthouse National Military Park in North Carolina.  This is where, in 1781, the Patriots lost a battle to the British, but ended up escaping almost unscathed.  Meanwhile, the British suffered a loss of over a quarter of their men.  The battle fought here weakened the British and helped win the freedom of America.

After that, we stopped at Booker T. Washington National Monument in Virginia.  This place honored the African American boy born into slavery who was freed after the Civil War, excelled in school, and became a first principal of Tuskegee Normal and Industrial School.  He became an author and orator, looked up to by many people of all races.

We met up with the Hoffmans at the Harvest Host, where we ate dinner with them and stayed the night.

The next morning, we got on the road again and went to Appomattox Court House National Historic Park (in Virginia) with the Hoffmans.  This is where General Lee (of the Confederate army) surrendered, marking the beginning of the end of the Civil War.  The reason it wasn’t the end was because the other generals of the Confederate army still had to surrender.  However, Lee’s surrender persuaded the other Confederate leaders to do the same.

At the Park, we walked around and looked at the different buildings, including a prison, the McLean house where Lee surrendered, and the tavern.

After that, the Hoffmans made their way to the Harvest Host we were staying at that night, while us Wongs went to Petersburg National Battlefield in Virginia.  This is where a nine month siege took place, ultimately ending in the Union cutting off Petersburg’s supplies and the Confederates losing.  About a week later, Lee surrendered.

A lot of the park was closed due to COVID, so we only got to see the graves of people who died during the siege (due to clashes between the two sides).

Finally, we drove to Keystone Truck and Tractor Museum in Colonial Heights, Virginia.  We went into the museum and stayed the night with the Hoffmans.  The museum had hundreds of vehicles.  There were tractors, trucks, bikes, and decorations.

The next morning, we moved to Virginia Landing RV Campground in Quinby, Virginia.  At the RV park, we clammed, crabbed, had campfires, and found different sorts of sea creatures like conch.  We went door-to-door in a neighborhood near the RV park.

On Saturday, us Wongs went to Assateague Island National Seashore, a NPS site dedicated to preserving the seashore, island, and wild horses there.  It was a drizzly, cold, windy day, soo most of the time, we stayed in our truck.  We got to see three horses from afar, as well as the ocean and a river (where we tried catching crabs and failed).

We moved after almost a week, but for now, here are pictures of some of the stuff we ate in this blog post:

Pictured Rocks – Michigan

On July 26, we moved to Pictured Rocks RV Park and Campground in Christmas, Michigan.  It was raining/drizzling when we left, and it was cloudy for most of the day.  The clouds cleared and it was  sunny in the evening.  It was humid the entire day.  After we had set up our RV in our RV site (in the rain), we went to Pictured Rocks National Lakeshore.  We visited the visitor center first to get information.  There was a video about the rocks at the visitor center, but most of the video and displays were about fishing in Lake Superior (because Pictured Rocks is right on Lake Superior).

Next, we drove along the main road through Pictured Rocks NL which goes from Munising to Grand Marais, which takes about an hour to drive and stopped at a few places:

Munising Falls:  We walked the short trail to view the waterfall from the bottom.  The first part of the trail was walking along or near the river that flowed from the waterfall and we crossed some bridges to get there.

A lookout over Lake Superior

Log Slide:  This trail is called Log Slide, but I didn’t see any logs as I had expected to see.  A trail led to a big sand dune, which was almost 200 feet above Lake Superior.  It was named after a chute that logging companies used to slide logs down into the lake.  We didn’t go down the sand dune; it can take five minutes descend, and an hour to get back up because of its steepness.

Sable Falls and Beach:  This trail had 168 steps.  We hiked to the waterfall, then beside the river, then to the beach where it emptied into Lake Superior.  The beach was mostly rocks.  There were a lot of pretty ones like quartz and granite.  On the beach, I was able to wade in the river that came from the waterfall and led into the lake.  It was pretty fast flowing.  I took a rock from the beach that was half granite and half quartz (or at least that’s what I think the rock was).

I will talk about the actual “pictured rocks” later on in this blog post.

On the way back home, we stopped at Seney National Wildlife Refuge.  There was a seven mile auto tour route, called the Marshland Wildlife Drive, leading through the refuge that we drove on.  It took us though forests and wetland areas with ponds and marshes.  We saw some trumpeter swans and a few sandhill cranes.  Along the sides of the roads, there were lots of milkweed plants with pretty pink flowers, berry bushes, pine and other trees, and monarch butterflies.

On August 1, we rented a pontoon boat from Seaberg Pontoon Rentals on Lake Superior.  It was the perfect day to go boating, since it was sunny and warm.  We went around Lake Superior and an island in it called Grand Island.  We got to see an old lighthouse, waterfalls, beaches, rock formations, and the pictured rocks.  The pictured rocks were very pretty.  They were tall rock cliffs with stripes of color, from brown and red to green and blue, streaking across and down them.  On top of the cliffs, I saw hikers and trees.  Parts of the cliffs had fallen down into the lake and on the beaches under the cliffs, along with the trees that were on them.  While we drove around the lake in our pontoon boat, we saw a lot of kayakers, who were looking at the rocks.  They were able to go into small crevices of and very near to the rock walls.  Under one rock arch, there was a pile of debris from something crumbling.  It could’ve been part of the arch itself.  The pile was really tall, and tons of seagulls were sitting on it.  They made me laugh, for their squawks echoing off of the arch’s walls sounded like the hooting of monkeys to me.  We got to drive through another arch with our boat, and the water underneath was quite shallow.  Water was dripping down from the top of the arch, so it looked like it was drizzling in some areas.  We stopped at a few beaches as well, where my brothers swam in the water and played in the sand and rocks.

We had lunch and dinner on the boat (spam musubis and pasta salad), and we stayed out almost all day.  We also ate a lot of snacks, like chips and pastries.  It was very enjoyable for me to be out in nature, and it was a very long day, but after boating, we went to one more place.

After returning the pontoon boat and taking everything back to our truck, we stopped at Bay Furnace Historic Site, which is in Hiawatha National Forest.  There was the ruins of a furnace at the site (which was recently stabilized), that was once used to make iron in the late 1800’s.

Exploring Penticton – Canada

Twin Lakes Golf Course and RV Park was a very beautiful park in Kaleden, British Columbia.

Twin Lakes Golf Course and RV Park
Twin Lakes Golf Course and RV Park

We met with an RVing family (Canadians whom we’d met in Arizona) and did some stuff with them.  One day, we went to Munson Mountain in Penticton and took a hike.  After, we went down to the city area and visited a botanical garden, the beach, and the giant peach ice cream shop (which was closed).

Hiking at Munson Mountain

Penticton Ikeda Japanese Garden, the beach, and the giant peach ice cream shop

Later in the week, (only) my family and I went to Twisted Hills Craft Cider.  Daddy and Mommy enjoyed going there, and I appreciated the wonderful design and architecture of the building.

Hiking, Mountains, and Caves – Arizona

Fort Bowie scenery

The day after moving to Fort Willcox RV Park in Willcox, Arizona, we visited Fort Bowie NHS.  It included a 3-mile roundtrip hike to the visitor center and ruins.  Fort Bowie, for a long time, was a place of military operations, and has ruins of old buildings that used to be there and interpretive signs.

wongs at fort bowie
Wong family at Fort Bowie

The next morning we went to Chiricahua NM.  It was established as a National Monument mainly to preserve the wonderful geological features, especially the rocks.

Sugarloaf Mountain Trail

Echo Canyon Trail

Though tired from the previous day’s hikes, we decided to hike at Coronado NM the next day.  They were short and in two totally different landscapes.

Windmill Trail

Coronado Cave Trail

Made a memorial because Coronado’s expedition passed by the area in their quest for the mythical 7 Cities, the place is mostly grasslands and hills, also with a small hidden cave.