Saint Louis – Iowa and Missouri

On August 17, we moved to St. Louis RV Park in St. Louis, Missouri.  The RV park was in the middle of the city, and it had a pool, which my brothers played in.

Before leaving, however, we stopped at Herbert Hoover National Historic Site in West Branch, Iowa.  It is where Hoover was born and lived until he was nine and was orphaned.  He became our 31st president, and he was president during the Great Depression.  It surprised me that his family was Quaker, and they lived in a Quaker community.  The site had buildings which Herbert and his family would’ve lived or worked in, such as a blacksmith, their cottage, and their Friend’s meetinghouse.

After that, we went moved to the RV park in Saint Louis.  We set up our RV, then we went to Gateway Arch National Park, which has the iconic arch of Missouri.  The arch itself was closed because of COVID-19 (you can usually take a tram to the top of the inside of the arch for a price), but we were able to view it from the outside, learn about it in the visitor center, and stand inside a replica of the top of the arch.  The replica was a very small sliver of what the arch would be like inside, and it had “windows” on it that were actually screens that showed live feed from cameras up on top the arch.  The screens were bigger than the windows would actually be.  We could even see our truck from the cameras.

The site included the Old Courthouse, where the famous first two trials of the Dred Scott case were held.  The case was about freedom of enslaved black people, Dred Scott and his wife specifically, because they filed suit for their freedom in the mid 1800’s.  In the end, Dred Scott and his wife lost, but it helped bring on the fight for enslaved people’s freedom in America, which eventually gave freedom to black people.  We weren’t able to go there, however, because it was closed.

After that, we ate at a restaurant and drove around the city.

The next day, we went to Ulysses S. Grant National Historic Site.  The site had a home and some other buildings on it.  Grant’s future wife, Julia Dent, and her family lived here.  Grant met her here, married her later on, then lived with the Dents on the property (which was about 850 acres) in the mid 1800’s.  He tried out farming, but that didn’t work out for long, so he rejoined the army (he had been in the army earlier in his life).  He eventually became a high ranking leader in the army during the Civil War, and later, the president of America.  Grant helped to win the Civil War for the Union side, and he valued African Americans as human beings, even allowing them to fight in the Civil War when others wouldn’t, and he fought against discrimination against black people.

We got to take a tour of the Dent house, called White Haven, even though it is now bright green.  We also got to see Budweiser Clydesdale horses, which are a rare breed of horses.

For dinner, we went to Uncle Dean and Aunty Jeanette’s house.  They are actually Daddy’s uncle and aunt, and we hadn’t seen them since we lived in McKinney (years ago).  I met their son, Evan, and his wife, Emily, as well as their son.  We talked, ate, and played Splendor with them.