Pictured Rocks – Michigan

On July 26, we moved to Pictured Rocks RV Park and Campground in Christmas, Michigan.  It was raining/drizzling when we left, and it was cloudy for most of the day.  The clouds cleared and it was  sunny in the evening.  It was humid the entire day.  After we had set up our RV in our RV site (in the rain), we went to Pictured Rocks National Lakeshore.  We visited the visitor center first to get information.  There was a video about the rocks at the visitor center, but most of the video and displays were about fishing in Lake Superior (because Pictured Rocks is right on Lake Superior).

Next, we drove along the main road through Pictured Rocks NL which goes from Munising to Grand Marais, which takes about an hour to drive and stopped at a few places:

Munising Falls:  We walked the short trail to view the waterfall from the bottom.  The first part of the trail was walking along or near the river that flowed from the waterfall and we crossed some bridges to get there.

A lookout over Lake Superior

Log Slide:  This trail is called Log Slide, but I didn’t see any logs as I had expected to see.  A trail led to a big sand dune, which was almost 200 feet above Lake Superior.  It was named after a chute that logging companies used to slide logs down into the lake.  We didn’t go down the sand dune; it can take five minutes descend, and an hour to get back up because of its steepness.

Sable Falls and Beach:  This trail had 168 steps.  We hiked to the waterfall, then beside the river, then to the beach where it emptied into Lake Superior.  The beach was mostly rocks.  There were a lot of pretty ones like quartz and granite.  On the beach, I was able to wade in the river that came from the waterfall and led into the lake.  It was pretty fast flowing.  I took a rock from the beach that was half granite and half quartz (or at least that’s what I think the rock was).

I will talk about the actual “pictured rocks” later on in this blog post.

On the way back home, we stopped at Seney National Wildlife Refuge.  There was a seven mile auto tour route, called the Marshland Wildlife Drive, leading through the refuge that we drove on.  It took us though forests and wetland areas with ponds and marshes.  We saw some trumpeter swans and a few sandhill cranes.  Along the sides of the roads, there were lots of milkweed plants with pretty pink flowers, berry bushes, pine and other trees, and monarch butterflies.

On August 1, we rented a pontoon boat from Seaberg Pontoon Rentals on Lake Superior.  It was the perfect day to go boating, since it was sunny and warm.  We went around Lake Superior and an island in it called Grand Island.  We got to see an old lighthouse, waterfalls, beaches, rock formations, and the pictured rocks.  The pictured rocks were very pretty.  They were tall rock cliffs with stripes of color, from brown and red to green and blue, streaking across and down them.  On top of the cliffs, I saw hikers and trees.  Parts of the cliffs had fallen down into the lake and on the beaches under the cliffs, along with the trees that were on them.  While we drove around the lake in our pontoon boat, we saw a lot of kayakers, who were looking at the rocks.  They were able to go into small crevices of and very near to the rock walls.  Under one rock arch, there was a pile of debris from something crumbling.  It could’ve been part of the arch itself.  The pile was really tall, and tons of seagulls were sitting on it.  They made me laugh, for their squawks echoing off of the arch’s walls sounded like the hooting of monkeys to me.  We got to drive through another arch with our boat, and the water underneath was quite shallow.  Water was dripping down from the top of the arch, so it looked like it was drizzling in some areas.  We stopped at a few beaches as well, where my brothers swam in the water and played in the sand and rocks.

We had lunch and dinner on the boat (spam musubis and pasta salad), and we stayed out almost all day.  We also ate a lot of snacks, like chips and pastries.  It was very enjoyable for me to be out in nature, and it was a very long day, but after boating, we went to one more place.

After returning the pontoon boat and taking everything back to our truck, we stopped at Bay Furnace Historic Site, which is in Hiawatha National Forest.  There was the ruins of a furnace at the site (which was recently stabilized), that was once used to make iron in the late 1800’s.