More of the U.P. – Michigan

On August 2, we moved to Green Light Resort & Campground in Chassell, Michigan.  After setting up our RV, we went to see our friends, the Guilis, who we met our first time visiting San Antonio, Texas in 2015 before moving there in 2016.  They had recently moved to the Upper Penninsula of Michigan from San Antonio.  We got to spend that evening and the next evening with them catching up.

On August 8, we visited A.E. Seaman Mineral Museum of Michigan Tech in Houghton, Michigan.  There were many displays about rocks, some precious or semi-precious, and copper, silver, and gold.  There was a lot about copper, because there are lots of copper mines in the area, and in the late 1900’s, there was a copper rush.  This place is one of the Keweenaw National Historical Park sites.  We also visited other ones this day, which I will talk about later in this post.

After that, we went to Isle Royale National Park’s visitor center in Houghton, Michigan, where we did junior ranger books and watched a short film about the islands.  The park is a wilderness that has many canoeing, kayaking, and hiking opportunities.  It is a big island surrounded by many small ones, and it protects animals such as wolves, moose, and bald eagles.  We weren’t able to go to the island because the ferry boats were cancelled for the summer due to COVID-19.

Then, we went to a few other sites of Keweenaw National Historic Park.

Quincy Mine in Hancock, Michigan:  This is an area of copper mines, which were operated from the mid 1800’s to the mid 1900’s.  We did not go into the mine itself, but we were able to see some of the old buildings and structures that were part of the mining operations there.

Copper Country Firefighters History Museum in Calumet, Michigan:  There were historic fire engines, some of which had hand cranked sirens.  The fire station was in use during the time of the copper rush.  It used to have stables for horses to pull the fire engines, which were horse powered at that time.  The upstairs was set up to show how things would’ve been set up for the firefighters, with beds, tables, and a bathroom.

The Guilis joined us after the Firefighters Museum and took us to see a waterfall in Eagle River, Michigan.  From there, they took us on a tour of the Keweenaw Peninsula.  We stopped with them at some lookouts, beaches, and playgrounds along the shores of Lake Superior.  One of the places we stopped at was Fort Wilkins State Park in Copper Harbor, Michigan.  The U.S. army built and occupied the fort during the copper rush to keep peace in the area between the miners and Ojibwas, as well as help with law enforcement.  The fort had buildings which were set up to look how they would’ve when the fort was occupied.  After the fort, the Guilis took us to Brockway Mountain.  It was a bumpy ride all the way up the  mountain, but well worth the view at the top.  The main picture above for this blog post is the view we had of trees and lakes below.  We ended the day back in Houghton at a city park named Chutes and Ladders because of the huge wooden play structure that was made up of many slides (chutes) and stairs (ladders).