Getting Things from Storage – Texas

Kayla Wong

We drove down to Texas to get things from storage, like next year’s school books for us children.  On the way down, we stopped at two different RV parks, a NPS site, and Buc-ee’s (a favorite roadtrip stop).

The two RV parks we stopped at were Tanbark (in Dickson, Tennessee) and Home Sweet Home (in Texarkana, Texas).  Tanbark had very pretty trees in fall colors, and there was a horse that we looked at.  The RV park we stopped to stay at near our storage was called Medina Lake RV Campground (a Thousand Trails RV Park), and it was near Medina Lake in Lakehills, Texas.  There were lots of twisty trees and friendly deer which were used to being fed by humans, and it was hilly in that area.

The NPS site that we visited was Little Rock Central High School National Historic Site in Little Rock, Arkansas.  We went there on October 21.  Central High is where the U.S. began an experiment to start integrating black people into white schools.  The ranger at the visitor center gave us a tour of the outside of the school.

In 1857, Central High allowed ten black students with perfect grades into the school (out of 200 students who had applied).  A lot of white people were upset about it and showed up at the school to protest integration.  In order to help the ten children more smoothly in their new school, Daisy Bates (also black) was chosen to help them.  The night before the ten were supposed to go to school, Daisy called all of their families with a plan, except for Elizabeth Eckford, since she had no phone.  The plan was to escort the children to school, along with both black and white ministers in hopes that the mob would be less likely to attack anyone.  Daisy planned to get Elizabeth early the next morning.

But Dasiy Bates forgot.  So Elizabeth, only fifteen years old, showed up at school the next day on September 4, 1957, unprepared for what she faced.  The governor of Arkansas, Orval Faubus, called the National Guard to block all African American children from entering the school, which directly defied federal law.  They did their duty, and Elizabeth, very confused, walked away from the school with a mob following her.  They called her mean things, spit on her, and threatened to kill her.  Eventually, with the encouragement of a few nice people and a bus, she was able to get away.  However, that day greatly affected her, and she suffers from mental health issues because of it.

Meanwhile, the other nine children went to school as planned.  However, at the door, they were turned away.  For the first time in their lives, these children had missed a day of school.

On September 25, 1957, President Eisenhower sends the 101st Airborne Infantry Division to escort nine out of the previous ten students into the school.  These nine are known as the Little Rock Nine.

On October 1, the National Guard, which had previously been ordered to block blacks from entering the school, took over the 101st Airborne’s duty.  They were sent to keep watch over and escort the Nine to the school.  However, the National Guard was able to be in basically only the school’s halls, so the students who didn’t like integration harassed and even tried to kill the Nine.  Eventually, the National Guard were removed from the school.  The Little Rock Nine went through the school year bravely.

Rather than repeat the previous year, Orval Faubus got Arkansas’ schools shut down, since he didn’t like integration.  This caused the state’s economy to be affected negatively.

Down in San Antonio, we saw our friends, the Paynes at both their house and the campground we were staying at.  We did a lot of things with them, including playing basketball and card games, visiting parks, and reading the Bible and singing with them.

On November 2, we drove up to Hickory Creek, Texas, where we stayed at Hickory Creek Campground.  We visited the Pattons for dinner a couple of times.

On November 4, we moved to Hot Springs RV Park in Arkansas, right near Hot Springs National Park.  On the way there, we stopped in Hope, Arkansas to go to President William Jefferson Clinton Birthplace Home National Historic Site.  We weren’t able to go inside the home, due to COVID, but we were able to read signs about Bill Clinton’s childhood and family in the visitor center.

Afterwards, we drove on to Hot Springs, Arkansas.

When we had set up our RV at the RV park we went to look around the national park.

First, we went to Bathhouse Row, which is a street with bathhouses built in the late 1800’s and early 1900’s which use water from the hot springs.  Fountains with hot spring water were scattered throughout the area, and we tried the water.  To me, it tasted like normal but hot water.  There was no sulfuric scent to it, like there had been at other hot springs we’d seen in the past.

We also went on a short walk and a scenic drive, where we could see the city and beautiful fall colors

The next day, we moved to Cross City RV Park in Corinth, Mississippi.  On the way, we stopped at Mississippi Final Stands Interpretive Center in Baldwyn, Mississippi, where we read about Civil War battles.

On November 6, while on the way to a Cracker Barrel in Florence, Kentucky, we stopped at Shiloh National Military Park.  We had visited there a year ago, looked around the park, and done junior ranger books, but we hadn’t been able to turn our completed books in due to COVID.  This time, we turned our books in and got badges in return.

On November 7, we drove up to Zanesville, Ohio to National Road Campground.

Food – Kentucky, Indiana, and Ohio

Here are the few pictures that I have of the food that we ate while in these three states.  An interesting dish in Cincinnati is their chili.  Compared to chili that we normally eat (in Texas), their chili was very different.  Cincinnati chili usually has spices like cumin, nutmeg, and cinnamon, and it was served on top of spaghetti.  It was created by Greek people, so that is probably why it tastes so different.  Anyway, I liked the dish, but I wouldn’t call it chili.

The Creation Museum – Kentucky

Ark Encounter

On Saturday, June 20, we visited the Creation Museum in Petersburg, Kentucky.  First, we went to the zoo and playground there.  The playground had a zipline sort of thing, which we really liked.  At the zoo, there were animals, including a wallaby, coati, zorse, and zonkey (all animals we had never seen before).

The museum was very well designed.  The decorations, colors, display setups, and wall designs gave each room a unique theme.  Mostly everything in the Creation Museum was about the Bible and how science relates to it.  It taught how evolution and creationism are different, how the different views line up with the evidence, and how, based on the creationist point of view, you should respond to it.  We watched a few movies inside, including one that was projected onto a wall and looked like it was being painted, a movie in the planetarium about aliens being fiction, and there was also a 4-D movie that was really cool about the seven days of creation.

Outside, we walked on a floating bridge and looked at the beautiful landscaping.  The floating bridge was bouncy and shaky, so some of us jumped while we walked to make it go up and down.

Going here was a very nice change for me.  This was the only museum I have ever visited that teaches from the creationist point of view.  All others I have been to teach from the evolutionist view, which omits God from the picture.

The next day, June 21, we visited William Howard Taft National Historic Site in nearby Cincinnati, Ohio.  William Taft was our 27th president.  He is the only person to have ever had the highest position in both the judicial and executive branches of the U.S. government.  We self-toured the Taft family house where William Taft was born and grew up.

After the Taft NHS, we stopped by at the Cincinnati Art Museum (also in the city of Cincinnati), which was free.  There were a lot of different types of paintings, sculptures, statues, and other art things like pottery and cultural decorations.  The building itself was a piece of art, with its architecture and design.

Finally that day, we went to the Ark Encounter in Williamstown, Kentucky.  It is basically a recreated version of the ark that Noah, his family, and tons of animals would’ve waited out the worldwide flood in.  The ark was built to be as close to Noah’s one as possible.  The people in charge used the measurements from the Bible, and they decorated the inside based off of the most logical explanations of how the animals and people would’ve fit in the ark.  Exhibits inside explained the flood, how the world was before it, and how it was afterwards.  The ark was really big, with four stories and tons of wood.  It is actually the world’s largest freestanding timber frame structure.

Outside the ark, bushes were cut to look like pairs of animals marching into the ark.  We also went to the zoo and playground there.  The zoo was a little bit different than the one at the Creation Museum in the animals it had (we saw kangaroos and an ostrich).  The playground was bigger here, and it had more things to use.

The Bluegrass State – Kentucky

On June 14, we moved to Diamond Caverns RV Resort & Golf in Park City, Kentucky.  Then, we went to Mammoth Cave National Park and hiked a few miles on trails which were a little steep.  Mammoth Cave protects the largest known cave system in the world, with over 400 miles of cave.  We didn’t go into the caves, and we just hiked above them, because the tours cost money and were sold out anyway.  It had been drizzly at first in the day, but when we got to Kentucky, it was sunny and hot, though it looked like it had rained earlier.

On June 19, we moved to Little Farm on the River RV Park, in Rising Sun, Indiana.  On the way, we went to Abraham Lincoln Birthplace National Historical Park and Abraham Lincoln’s boyhood home at Knob Creek.  At the first place, there was a monument for Abraham Lincoln with 58 steps, 2 to represent the number of terms he served as president, and 56 to represent his age when he was assassinated.  There was also the Sinking Spring, which is a spring slightly lower than the ground, which the Lincolns would’ve used to get water when they were living there.  It was cold near the spring, probably because it was underground.  Abraham Lincoln was born here in his family’s log cabin in 1809.  In 1811, they had to leave Sinking Spring over land disputes and moved to Knob Creek (the second place that we visited).  Abraham Lincoln lived in a few more places later on his life.  He was our 16th president, and he is known for preserving the Union and abolishing slavery.  Abraham Lincoln, although born and raised on a farm out in the country, mostly educated himself and was able to become many things, eventually the president of the United States of America.  The second place, Knob Creek, had cabins, which we couldn’t enter, because of COVID-19.  The weather was humid and hot.